Blue Hour Photo Workshops

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Archive for Finding Your Photographic Voice

Subdued Simplicity

Over the eight weeks that Phil Vaughn attended the online photo workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice», I noticed a significant development in his photography. By the end of the workshop, Phil was both clearer in his approach and were able to express his vision with more strength.

I think this is quite evident in the personal photo project he worked on during the last four weeks of the workshop. The theme for the project was something so everyday-like as a park, but the photos has a personal touch and transcend the peacefulness and quiet that many parks represents for its urban users.

Phil photographed the airy Engler Park, Farmington, Missouri with a subdued sensibility. The photos radiate this tranquil approach in both composition and the photos’ colour palette. The colours are a strange combination of being muted as well as subtle. There is a simplicity over his work that strengthens the expression and underlines the serene feeling of the park.

During the four weeks, Phil worked on the project he returned to the park during all times of the day. He photographed the visitors of the park, their activity as well as the more deserted areas of the park. The photo project comes together as a visual essay that tells the story of life and environment in a pleasant park.

Later in the spring I will start up another round of the online workshop, more specifically May 22nd. If you are interested, you will find more information about «Finding Your Photographic Voice» on the web site of Blue Hour Photo Workshops.

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A Classical Documentary

It’s time to present another of the participant’s work from last year’s online workshop. Pat Callahan made a classical, visual documentary story for his personal photo project when participating in the online workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» last year. And he did it with conviction and through a entrancing narration. In his portrayal of the Irish village Courtmacsherry, Pat captures the daily life of its villagers, whether kids and youngsters having fun in the harbour, a quiet moment of in the local pub, a burial or the bliss of a wedding.

The strength of Pat’s visual portrayal of Courtmacsherry is his well-developed talent both to perceive good composition and finding those smaller or bigger moments that bring the story together. He is a master of the decisive moment as articulated by Henri Cartier-Bresson. His eye is sharp and his technical skills foster the stories each of the photos tells so well, as it does the overall narrative of the photo essay.

What really impresses me with the essay is Pat’s ability to get close to the people he photographs. I mean both literally and on an emotional level. The people he photographs aren’t even noticing Pat, they go about doing there things as if he is not present with a camera. People clearly trust him. They let him into their sphere and into their lives, as if he is one of them. From that standpoint, he quietly and gently goes about photographing whatever they are doing, seemingly unnoticed and without interrupting the proceedings.

The black and white format fits perfectly the story of a village where time seems to have stood still and life goes about as it has done for decades. The photos become a glimpse into time long forgotten in most other places, where the community and care for each other is still the important factor in life.

If you like to see more of his work, look up the website and blog of Pat Callahan.

Later in the spring Blue Hour Photo Workshops will start up another round of the online workshop, more specifically May 22nd. If you are interested, you will find more information about «Finding Your Photographic Voice» here on the web site of Blue Hour Photo Workshops. Furthermore, if you sign up before the end of April you will get the workshop for a discounted price. Only this week left for the reduced price!

The Magic Pond

© Lee Cleland

© Lee Cleland

© Lee Cleland

© Lee Cleland

© Lee Cleland

Over the next couple of weeks, Blue Hour Photo Workshops will present the work of participants of last year’s online photo workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice». First out is Lee Cleland. During the last four weeks of the workshop each participants work on their own personal project, and Lee chose to photograph a small and elusive pond, surrounded by an open cluster of trees. The pond is situated in a large and lush landscape, and provided Lee with amble opportunities to convey its magic trough a gentle and distinct vision.

Lee approached the project from a variety of angles, capturing the open landscape, details in and around the pond, the small animals living of the pond, its plants and the different ambiences that occurred over time. Her photos have a quiet aesthetics, using a subtle and secluded colour palette. They clearly show she has a refined eye which radiates through her sensitive and unique voice.

What I really like about Lee’s work is that she constantly tried out new approaches over the four weeks she was working on her personal project. In the beginning, she came back with some beautiful landscape pictures, one that can be seen in this little selection above, and she also quickly started to shoot the small inhabitants of the pond. Soon she started to experiment with various techniques, such as using flash, using long handheld exposure time, and using different aperture.

The final product is a beautiful series of quiet landscape and nature photos. They convey the magic of the intriguing pond—they are magic in and of themselves. For more of her photography, please look up Lee’s blog Beyond Purgatory ~ A Photographer’s Paradise.

Later in the spring Blue Hour Photo Workshops will start up another round of the online workshop, more specifically May 22nd. If you are interested, you will find more information about «Finding Your Photographic Voice» on the web site of Blue Hour Photo Workshops. Furthermore, if you sign up before the end of April you will get the workshop for a discounted price.

Develop Your Photographic Voice

Do you want to develop your unique photographic voice? Then Blue Hour Photo Workshop’s online photo workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» will help you on the way. I, the teacher Otto von Münchow, am starting another round of my acclaimed workshop in May this spring. I promise it will be quite an experience and of course more importantly, an indispensable aid to expand you photographic seeing and how you are able to express your vision through the development of a distinctive voice.

The workshop runs over eight weeks. I know; eight weeks sound like a huge commitment, but remember I always try to be flexible and let participants catch up if they can’t deliver each week. How much work you have to put down for it to be worthwhile, various from one person to another. Some shoot an hour or two each week, while others may spend time photographing each day of the week. Naturally, the more time you spend photographing the more you will benefit from the workshop, but in the end, it’s all up to you.

However the approach is, I think everybody who has participated in the workshop over the years, feel they have grown photographically over the eight weeks’ span. I am so confident that this is a great way to develop you photographic voice, that if you sign up and are not happy I will reimburse the money you spent on it.

During the workshop, you will receive a booklet in which I discuss the week’s theme and give ideas to how to approach a specific photographic challenge in order to develop your photographic voice. And then you will get weekly assignments. The booklets add up to a valuable book. However, the real value of the workshop is the individual feedback you get to every assignment. Every week I will record a video with your submitted pictures and my comments to each of them. This will all add up to around three hours or individual and indispensable feedback.

It’s not the most inexpensive photo workshop in the market, but no other workshop offers this kind of individual feedback, that is really what will help you develop your photographic voice. The regular price is 320 dollars, however, if you sign up and pay before April 30th, you will get it for only 220 dollars.

Do you want to develop your photographic voice? Why don’t you sign up for the next workshop starting as of May 22nd? You will find more information here.

This is some of the feedback from participants that took «Finding Your Photographic Voice» last year:
Lee Cleland: «I thoroughly enjoyed the challenge of the course and the way it was laid out. The critiques were most valuable to me and often pointed out things I would never have picked myself.»

Vigdis Askjem: «I think it’s great that you are thorough in your photo critique. The course has really pushed me and given me new ideas and understanding in relation to photography and subject. I note that I am currently hungry for creative work.»

Pat Callahan: «I thought the best aspect of the workshop was the quality of the feedback every week. It was obviously thoughtfully prepared and professionally delivered. It was well balanced, covering both what I did well and what I could improve.

I have been fortunate to have attended workshops with a few renowned photographers, and the feedback was less carefully prepared and less insightful (and much more expensive). I also liked the pace of the course, the two month remote delivery was very manageable. I would highly recommend your workshop!»

Phil J. Vaughn: «I appreciate your hard work in teaching the workshop. I consider it to have been a valid and valuable learning experience. When I am out on a photo trek, I find myself silently repeating: “Watch your framing. Open up the view. Work the scene.” I enjoyed the opportunity to hone skills a bit more.

Working toward a “finished” project as a goal is helpful and directive. It is likely that most photographers don’t have the kind of goal and are just taking photos as they appear. It’s good to think in a new direction.»

The Magical Pond

© Leonne Cleland

© Leonne Cleland

© Leonne Cleland

© Leonne Cleland

© Leonne Cleland

Lee Cleland participated in my last round of the online workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice». In the second part of the workshop, the participants work on a personal project for the remainder of the course. Lee chose to shoot a project close to home. She called it the Dam-project, and that is exactly what it is. Lee photographed a little pond or dam on her property, and wanted to capture images of the dam at all times of the day and in all weathers with an emphasis on the details and moods she saw there.

The pictures in this post are a little edit of Lee’s project. What really impressed me was her willingness to try out new approaches each week and how she was able to come up with different images of the pond through the last part of workshop. Lee created a coherent and beautiful body of work of the dam. She captured lovely overviews for the viewer to get a sense of the special pond and then focused on enchanting details. Some where small snippets of moments when for instance a dragonfly had settled on a leaf on the pond, some where much more impressionistic, using different techniques such as long exposure time or flash. The project came delightfully together as can be seen by this edit here. Lee was able to capture the magical feeling that radiates from the pond, she brought her own vision into the equation and produces a tantalizing photo essay about this little pond she has on her property. Her project is an example that it is not necessary to travel far and long to be able to create wonderful work. You can see more of Lee’s photos on her blog Beyond Purgatory.

Next week I will be starting another around of «Finding Your Photographic Voice». There is still space if you feel like developing your photographic vision. However, hurry up, then, so you are ready for the first lesson I will send out on Monday. You find more information about the online workshop here.

A Dog’s Life

In a little less than three weeks Blue Hour Photo Workshops will start another round of the online photo workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice». It’s an eight week workshop that will take you photography to a whole new place. If you don’t know about yet, you will more info here, or just sing up to get the first lesson for free (no strings attached).

This is some of the photos one of the participants, Meg Greene Malvasi, made during during the last workshop.

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

© Meg Greene Malvasi

For her personal photo project during the eWorkshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» Meg Greene Malvasi decided to go ahead and do a photographic study on the dog Hubble. As she wrote in the description of the project, Hubble has been a hard dog to break through to as he suffers from PTSD, after clearly having been abused in his early life. Meg found Hubble in a ditch a little over two years ago. He was obviously ready to give up and die. Interestingly enough Meg photographing Hubble has helped him with his confidence. Meg decided to approach the project for the workshop along two paths. One was more of a documentary approach while the other was a more formal studio set-up kind of photography. The two approaches award the viewer more depth and more layers in understanding Hubble and in revealing his complex character. We see his playful character but also his innate shyness. We see him drawn between wanting to burst out of his shell and wanting to withdraw from the danger of the world surrounding him. Meg’s use of different styles and approaches show the many faces of Hubble. She captures his personality with a gentle expression and with absolute respect. Her decision to go with of black and white for the documentary photos and colour for the set-ups adds dimensions to the portrayal of Hubble. Meg uses framing and various techniques to tell the story of Hubble – and she does so beautifully, purposefully, playfully and gracefully.

Starting Another eWorkshop

Finding Your Voice_Poster_BHPW

In January Blue Hour Photo Workshops will once again start up the eWorkshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice». If you want to develop your photography into a more distinct and expressive way this is a good opportunity to get a guided hand and feedback from a professional photographer. As you may know Blue Hour Photo Workshops offer quite a few workshops around the world. The eWorkshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» is an inexpensive and convenient way of learning from home.

We promise you this will be an inspirational experience. Together we will explore many sides of the creative process within the realm of photography. It will be fun. It will be challenging. But more than anything it will be a learning experience.

The workshop starts up on January 26th and runs over eight weeks. Each week you will receive a little booklet (as a PDF-file) with inspirations, thoughts, knowledge and ideas for your shooting the next week. Then you will have a week to do the various assignments, of which you will send me an edited selection. Finally you will receive my comments about the photos, included suggestions for improvement – and in which direction I believe you should move your photography.

«Finding Your Photographic Voice» is foremost about creativity and developing your seeing as a photographer and being able to express your vision. It’s not a technical workshop, although we will touch upon technical matters whenever needed. Finding one’s voice is a lifetime project, and eight weeks will not make you come out on the other side with a fully developed photographic voice. But the workshop will guide you on the way to finding it.

If this sounds interesting, you will find more information about the eWorkshop here. Or send me an email: Otto

This is some feedback from previous participants:
You do a fantastic serious work and I feel that I am constantly met with full respect at the level where I am. Would not have wanted to do this trip with another photo teacher. Your way of looking at the photographic process, creativity and creation feels right for me and I have full confidence in you as a person.

I was especially impressed with the depth of the feedback you provided. You always highlighted both what was good and what could be improved. The balance is nice and important.

In my mind, I hear elements of the workshop echoing each time I pick up my camera. This was the most effective learning experience I’ve ever encountered with photography.